Hi, my name is Tim Teege
and this is my blog. 👋

Tim Teege I write about enjoying endurance sports to increase health and happiness since 2011.

Usually I run a company in Hamburg, Germany, and apart from spending time running I read 25 books in the last 12 months, love making music, building stuff, and being the father to four sweet girls.

Read more about me or discover what I’m up to now.

Quantified Teesche

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New York City: Manhattan Perimeter Ultramarathon →

New York City. Arguably the greatest city in the world, the center, maybe even the capital of Earth, if there was one.

This is the story about my run around the coast of its central island, Manhattan.

I decided to fly to New York City about five months ahead of the trip, because I needed a break from daily life. Too much of the same, no space to think. Most people would then head to a quiet place, maybe somewhere in the mountains or by the sea, but my preferred change of pace leads me to the United States of America. I have seen the city in person twice before and loved it. New York City has so much to offer, so much convenience, so many possibilities.

One of those is running. While most runners in Manhattan prefer Central Park or a stretch along the Hudson river for a short fitness-boosting run, I was immediately thinking about Manhattan’s perimeter. Along the coast, around the whole main island, is that possible? Turns out, yes. Some people have done it before and there’s an impressive Fastest Known Time set on that route.

Read on


Fastest Known Time for Peter Huggett on Fehmarnumrundung →

The island of Fehmarn is Germany’s third largest one with an area of 185 km². It’s known for having a sunny sub-climate and therefore it’s a popular holiday destination for Germans in the Baltic Sea, easily reachable via a bridge.

Fehmarn
Fehmarn

During the summer of 2021, the extended family and I were fortunate to spend a week’s holiday on Fehmarn, enjoying the peace and quiet of the place and the noise of our kids at the same time. We liked it so much we decided to do it again this year, in 2022.

In the meantime, I got the idea of running the perimeter of the island. Around the whole of Fehmarn on the outer most accessible routes, which is about 68 kilometers. Many people have certainly already done this, but according to the fastestknowntime.com stats, the current best is at just 6:33 hours, which I thought would be possible for me to beat.

Then, a few weeks before the holiday, another thing happened. Unfortunately, my father-in-law Peter Huggett died at the age of just 75 after battling the terrible disease of ALS for about two years.

Read on


Spring is Over, Summer is Here: Season Recap and Outlook →

Half the year is over! Or, in my way of measuring time these days, two quarters of the year are over!

91 days lay between April 1st and June 30th. That’s a timespan long enough to make it possible to see some changes. But first, here are a few of my highlights of these past three months!

The season started off strong with a solid Freiburg Marathon training race
The season started off strong with a solid Freiburg Marathon training race
Two friends and I organized a 200 kilometer foot race and it worked out
Two friends and I organized a 200 kilometer foot race and it worked out
I ran a marathon in 3:00:40 hours and had a beer afterwards with my friend Nico
I ran a marathon in 3:00:40 hours and had a beer afterwards with my friend Nico
Company retreat trip to Berlin with my team – good times with great food
Company retreat trip to Berlin with my team – good times with great food
A family affair: battling it out at Neuhaus Triathlon
A family affair: battling it out at Neuhaus Triathlon
For my father-in-law’s 75th, just a few weeks before his untimely death, I cycled down to him on the bike he built and left me. May you rest in peace, Peter.
For my father-in-law’s 75th, just a few weeks before his untimely death, I cycled down to him on the bike he built and left me. May you rest in peace, Peter.

Read on


Quantified Teesche – An Expedition into the World of Tracking a Life →

In order to improve anything, you first have to take measure of it.

I’ve long been interested in measuring parts of my life in order to gain knowledge about what works and what doesn’t, but also just out of basic curiosity without any specific goal in mind. One early example I came across was the mathematician Stephen Wolfram, who took this to new extremes. In addition to the basics like weight and sleep, he measures things like how many keystrokes he types in his life, or the time of day he’s most likely to be on the phone.

This type of collecting data is all good fun, but the interesting part is correlating it. That’s the part many of the so-called Big Data companies still don’t get quite right, apart from building the foundation for how their advertising clients could target their audiences. But that’s a different topic.

I’m talking about gaining insight into one’s own habits from these measured data points for one’s own benefit.

Our devices and apps already track so much information about us, but making it truly accessible to us is something that’s seemingly not worth developing for the companies who created the hardware and software.

So, how can we liberate our data?

Read on


For the Record: Training for and Trying a Sub-3 Hour Marathon →

The story of the moving goalpost. You should know when to say “enough is enough” and be content with what you have achieved. On the other hand, as Elvis Presley famously said:

Ambition is a dream with a Tesla Model S Plaid engine.

(I might have slightly changed that quote to fit better into today’s era.)

I’ve been running for about 10-12 years by now, 95 percent of the time without any ambition to get any faster. I’m just enjoying running for what it is. The great variety you can have just by changing distance, scenery, or company, is enough usually. But speed, of course, is another aspect of running. Mostly unexplored by me.

Am I able to run a marathon in less than three hours?

What do the numbers suggest?
What do the numbers suggest?

Seven years ago, in March of 2015, I did a professional performance diagnostics session at the Asics Running Lab, just for fun. After testing and analyzing every aspect of my body in relation to my current and theoretical running abilities, Doctor Joachim Schwarzer told me I could currently run a marathon in 3:40 hours, and the best possible result I can ever expect in a marathon race would be around 3:15 hours.

Mister Schwarzer measuring my abilities
Mister Schwarzer measuring my abilities

Read on


Grüner Ring 200: Organizing and Supporting a 200 Kilometer Running Race →

There and Back Again.

As with many races in the COVID era, it’s been a while between coming up with the idea and the race actually taking place. Our first planned edition was supposed to happen in Spring of 2021, but not enough people were vaccinated at the time. So we postponed it until now.

We, that is Michael Mankus and me, again. As with Hamburg Everest in 2019 and Binnenalsterultra 2022, and also 42_16, it is the two of us initiating and making these unusual and exciting running events happen. Full disclosure, Micha is the one who has the ideas first and comes to me with them, so we can pull them off together. Sharing tasks and the responsibility makes it easier.

200 Kilometers of Running – Wait, but why?!

Certainly, pushing the limits is one aspect. Another would be that there’s not a huge amount of races offered publicly which have a length of this kind, and one of our goals is to provide people with the possibility to run more. Because running rocks!

Read on


🌈 New Quarter, Theme, Goals, Intents! (Spring 2022) →

After these first 90 days of 2022 it’s time for a short review and an outlook into the future. First off, the new rhythm of quarterly moments of reflections seems to be working out for me and feels right. I managed to complete a lot of the set goals and aim to continue earning my title of King of New Year’s Resolutions which someone recently gave me. 😉

🪞Theme Reflection and Search For a New Theme

🗺️ The Season of Exploration did exactly what I hoped it would. After the almost static 2021 it made me come out of my shell and experience new things. Here are the to me most impactful of them:

Read on


Educational Project: How to Become a Better Manager →

📹 Video vs. 🎙 Podcast vs. ✍️ Writing

Ever since I’ve read the brilliant book The Making of a Manager by Julie Zhou, I felt the urge to share her wisdom about being a better manager somehow. The format of a Youtube video showing a guy explaining something seemed to be a fitting way to do so, although I have next to no experience with creating something like that. 

In the spirit of Exploration, which is the theme I chose for this current season, I decided to give it a try. I went through my notes about the book, translated them into German, created a coherent script, learned to do basic video cut using the free software called Davinci Resolve, and recorded myself talking in a semi-coherent way about the lessons in the book. Looks simple, sounds simple. But it’s not, at least for me. I felt reminded of the quote:

Everyone’s job looks simple until you’re the one doing it.

Read on


New Book Out – The Story of my EU Marathon Runs →

You can now buy an eBook written by me and it’s called "Running in the EU". 

It’s a book!
It’s a book!

As the title says, this is a compendium of the blog posts I wrote during the time I ran all the EU’s capital city marathon races from 2011 to 2018. It’s been a wild ride and to me it’s especially interesting how my style of writing and experiencing these trips slowly changed over the course of those seven years. Compare that first to my last marathon report, Amsterdam vs Nicosia – they’re worlds apart. 

Here’s the Amazon link to buy for your kindle, but if you’re more into reading for free or on Apple’s Books among others, you can also download the EPUB file format version on my website www.teesches-marathons.eu.

Since I’ve self-published the book, I arbitrarily set the price on Amazon to 4,99 €, but I will give any money I get paid 100% to Doctors without Borders. That’s just in case Amazon doesn’t decide to keep it all for themselves, which I sort of suspect. Gotta pay for Bezos’ rockets! 

Read on


My Intentions for 2022 →

💡 Living with Intent

It’s time to look ahead. A few days ago, I posted my personal review of 2021 and received lots of positive feedback for it. Thanks! It didn’t expect that, because the year felt more like a transition year to me, full of compromise. Probably I’m not the only one there, as this whole pandemic era seems to be a global transition. Many people are confused, unsure about the future, more careful to be optimistic. This might be why some replies to my review stressed how it was a refreshing read during that particular time. The most used word was a variation of “inspiring”, and that made me very happy. Now I have already answered part of the next question.

🎯 Why Goals?

Or, more general, just Why with a capital W. The nominalization of that word has become popular and is now often used as in “But what’s your Why?” Some also refer to it as their North Star.

In this last year in particular, it occurred to me that my Why is changing. When I started setting public goals at the beginning of 2017, now five years ago, it was solely an end to itself. A bit of curious experimentation, but mostly a way of motivating myself and holding myself accountable for things I wanted to do but feared I wouldn’t follow through on otherwise.

Read on


Review of 2021 →

One of my favorite parts of the end of the year is taking some time to reflect on how it’s been going. What went well, what not so much, what can I improve for next year? Have I reached the goals I set for 2021, were they the right ones? What were the highs and the lows?

This is the sixth year in a row I’m doing it publicly. If you want to see the development, read Review 2016Review 2017Review 2018Review 2019, Review 2020.

Read on


Mozart 100 – Going Ultra in Salzburg →

These days it doesn’t happen often that a race I’m doing breaks not just one but several personal records. I think that’s great, because for me it’s still important to sometimes push myself to new levels and see what I can do.

🏆 For The Record! 

The first record is one that was completely out of my hands, though. Longest time between race signup and the race actually taking place. This, obviously, is due to the COVID-19 pandemic which had the world in its hands since the beginning of 2020. I signed up on October 1st, 2019 for the 2020 edition which was supposed to take place in June. The race got postponed, then cancelled. I was presented with the option to use my registration to do the race in 2021 instead, June again, but it got postponed again – to September 4th. By now, most of us are vaccinated and it seems like it’s rather safe to do such an event. Between registration and race, that’s almost a full two years.

Read on


1st Munich Great Breweries Ultra →

Finally I have something running related to write about! One and a half years into this pandemic, most interesting races are still being cancelled or are happening under circumstances which take the fun out of it, so we have to keep taking matters into our own hands until further notice. 

Munich. A few years ago I reconnected with an old friend from school, Nico, because he suddenly appeared on Strava as he had taken up running. He had been living in Munich for the past ten years, but was visiting Hamburg regularly due to his parents being here. We had a few runs together, kept in touch, and he then came up with the idea of planning a route through Munich we could run together which would connect all seven official Munich breweries. 

The Seven Official Munich Breweries

Just seven? Of course, there are plenty more breweries in the city serving a million inhabitants. But in order to be legally allowed to define your brewery as a genuine Munich brewery, you have to fulfil two criteria. You have to have your brewery located on Munich’s turf and you have to draw your own water for it using a well which is also within the city’s bounds. Preferably near your brewery, for obvious reasons. For a long time, there have been six breweries which were accepted, but a seventh one made it into the list recently.

Read on


Halftime: How 2021 is Going →

Making plans is one thing, following through with them another. Now, after the mid point of 2021, it seems like a good time to pause and reflect, and maybe, course correct.

The Year of Stability

In contrast to making hard goals, a good additional method to utilize seemed to be setting a theme for the year. I went with Stability, because I would like the sometimes chaotic growth of previous years to relax and plateau for a while. This is connected to more reflective thought processes as well. Asking myself questions like “will this decision lead to more stability or more upheaval, likely?” or “how is this decision going to help me further my efforts in regards to stability?” has for sure been helpful.

I have to remind myself of it from time to time, but because I can see how it helps, I’m keeping the theme.

Also stable, the frozen Alster lake earlier this year during a run with Thorsten
Also stable, the frozen Alster lake earlier this year during a run with Thorsten

12 & 12

Part of my stability plan is to keep going with 12 marathons and 12 books per year. Something for the body, something for the mind. Halfway through, I’m quite on point with 6 full marathons and 7 books.

Read on


My Work Setup: Hardware and Software I use in 2021 →

Inspired by Stefan Zweifel, Dave Rupert, and Ali Abdaal, all of whom productivity favorites of mine, this post is to showcase the hardware, workflows, apps, and tools which I use daily. In the spirit of “Show Your Work” (-place) and the possible resulting serendipity I recently convinced myself that this might be of interest to others. It certainly will look funny to revisit a post like this a few years from now with all the then antiquated apps and logos in it!

Read on


Goals for 2021 →

Finally a new year for new plans! Yes, I know that it’s still an arbitrary point in time, but who cares. I like making these plans. After 2020, which was certainly quite different but somehow worked out well for the goals I set, I’m keen on making 2021 an enjoyable year while working with the restrictions we’ve all been facing and will be for a while.

We all had to find that adaptability quality within us during the last year. There were so many changes to our everyday life in 2020 that now we’re longing for stability, I think. At least I am.

But I must admit that I personally haven’t been impacted in a challenging way.

In the first months of the pandemic business was tough for my company, too, but we recovered quickly and successfully got rid of our newly rented office in favor of the home office. Due to her job at the hospital, Sophie had to take what felt like dozens of PCR tests for the virus over the months, and a few times we were really eager to find out the results as quickly as possible in order to minimize the probability to infect the more vulnerable people in our family.

Read on


Goals 2020: How Did I Do? →

2020 is over, time for a review! 

For five years in a row, I have now written down what I had been up to at the end of each year (Review 2016, Review 2017, Review 2018, Review 2019). In general it’s been very satisfying to do so and it made me go through the months with a bit more of a perceived purpose. 

At the halfway point of this odd year, I have already given a review, so this post is mainly about the second half of the year. And, as always, I will follow this post up with another one about my plans and ideas for 2021. That will include an update on my three goals for the decade.

It’s funny remembering I was flying on planes and walking through airports earlier in the year
It’s funny remembering I was flying on planes and walking through airports earlier in the year
And went to my last public concert at the end of February, together with Sophie – Polyphia
And went to my last public concert at the end of February, together with Sophie – Polyphia

Read on


Coast 2 Coast Ultra: Running from the North Sea (Husum) to the Baltic Sea (Eckernförde) →

Time for another self-organized ultra run!

This time it took Oli and me to the town of Husum within Germany’s state of Schleswig-Holstein
This time it took Oli and me to the town of Husum within Germany’s state of Schleswig-Holstein

Still, there are no races in sight, and for obvious reasons it wouldn’t be the smartest move to take part in any if there were some. Which leaves explorers like me with few options. The FKT movement (i.e. ”Fastest Known Time”) is still going strong and is growing, and the idea of it still appeals to me in these times. And because Germany has access to two major seas, the North Sea and the Baltic Sea, the challenge is clear: running from one to the other!

My running buddy Oli, whom you might remember from November’s post about running the Holsteinische Schweiz Trail was again up for the challenge, which is nice because I’d have some company on these dark and cold days somewhere in northern Germany.

Dark and cold days require special gear like these new waterproof gloves we both got for the run
Dark and cold days require special gear like these new waterproof gloves we both got for the run
Because it was about to snow! The year’s first snow arrived just before the end of the year, today on December 29th.
Because it was about to snow! The year’s first snow arrived just before the end of the year, today on December 29th.

Read on


Small November Ultra: Holsteinische Schweiz Weg →

The ongoing pandemic keeps making us find new routes to run. A few weeks earlier, in an edition of the newsletter from the FastestKnownTime.com peeps this new record time was mentioned, located in Northern Germany’s state of Schleswig-Holstein, leading from the city of Plön to the city of Eutin via the Holsteinische Schweiz Weg.

Run by a familiar name to me, Judith Havers. While I haven’t yet met her, we have common friends and I recognized her name and felt happy to see her making these international waves as one of the three highlighted athletes on the worldwide scene of our little ultra running niche. 5 hours, 1 minute, 14 seconds for 53.36 kilometers, a solid effort. 

Fallen leaves on the ground
Fallen leaves on the ground

Read on


#comeon1more – Incremental Running Streak Month →

Powered by hot baths, cold showers, horse ointment, and Chartreuse.

Since this COVID-19 pandemic is still going on, I’ve also still been missing out on real challenges. All the races remain cancelled and the outlook continues to be bleak.

One substitute that proved itself to be a viable option turned out to be self-appointed challenges. Set a (stupid) goal for myself and have a go at it. Back in June I followed through on a month long quest to run a #10keveryday, which has been very rewarding. My spirit and happiness, as well as my fitness level, went straight up. In the aftermath of that month I used that result to go for a double marathon weekend, then a week of daily half marathons, a go at a new personal best on the marathon distance (3:10:10, over seven minutes faster than my previous best), and a 100k run from Hamburg to the Baltic Sea

Read on


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